Combat Conditioning: The Foundations of Survival

Combat Conditioning: The Foundations of Survival

It is hard to simulate full intensity in training because you need to follow safety protocols designed to prevent injuries. Using the best and most advanced protective gear can help you train better. Your training partner is critical to simulating intensity. It is ok to learn a technique without stress, but when you know the technique well enough, it’s time to train it under stress. Your training partner must adopt the role of a real “bad guy” and simulate his attack with enough speed, power, unpredictability, and resistance. Contrary to popular belief, your partner is not doing you any favors by attacking gently and letting you win easily. He needs to make the attack “dirty” in order for you to benefit from it. For example, when attacking you with a knife, he must simulate several thrusts at high speed and try to free his arm when you try to control it. When choking or grabbing, he must try to surprise you and apply real resistance to simulate real stress. When training two attackers against one, one attacker often waits for the other to finish his or her attack. When simulating reality, you cannot wait. You must put constant pressure on your training partner in order to challenge him correctly. Remember—in real life, you won’t be attacked by an old lady with osteoporosis. You will be attacked by a psychotic, blood thirsty beast in his prime. To make training efficient, you must attack with speed, surprise, intensity, and resistance.

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The Illusion of Control

The Illusion of Control

Knife attacks are brutal! Many times, they involve multiple stab wounds and are always very up close and personal. Krav Maga offers solutions for these types of attacks. Typically defend, counter attack, and move. However, some martial arts instructors train their student to try and control the perpetrator’s hand that is holding the knife. Although this tactic is theoretically possible, it does not match up to reality and what it takes to actually stop the attack.

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